Re write of “Do digital natives exist?”

Most educators and facilitators that are in the classroom have difficulty in utilising technology and most often, students themselves teach the teachers how to turn on the SmartBoard or how to take away the sidebar from the window, even including how to move the cursor away from the streaming line when watching a Youtube video.

This is because of the huge technological advancement gap between all generations.

Marc Prensky’s “Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants Part 1″, suggests that individuals confronted by the introduction of new technological terminology and the practicality of new technology such as the IPhone or iPad and their new formats produce”A language learned later in life, scientists tell us, goes into a different part of the brain…”.

When I entered high school, I saw what they called “Smart Boards” and to be honest it was all so new to me that even other kids in my grade already had these in their own classrooms when they left primary school. For that brief moment, it felt like I was a ‘digital immigrant’ but I learnt quickly.

One statement of improvement that was commented on my original post was that I’m supposed to include, how individuals “may or may not be familiar with new technologies”. To be educated and to value from learning was to work hard manually and develop a great deal of understanding in a manual manner, through reading and calculating on a manual basis. Since this era of understanding, individuals may find it difficult to adapt to areas of new technology, not only to its fast pace and complexity, but to its influence within education and how it affects the minds and worlds of those using the technology and future generations.

So what do you think? Are you a digital native or a digital immigrant? And do digital natives exist?

So are you ready? Here we go…

Referencing:

 

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Commentary

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Original post

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Ethical issues within technology 

The digital world is one that is open yet you you need to be cautious about what you do and how it affects those behind the screen and how it’ll impact what they say next behind the keyboard.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights or UDHR, clearly states the rights of any individual in the digital world. Article 19, states that “Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.” (UDHR, 1948)

However, this ‘right’ in today isn’t fully functioning in many people’s mindset when battling on the keyboard. Many posts and statements made through social media and the digital world are sometime encouraging but yet most become violent feuds of commentary and is an area of which results in cyber bullying.

I could speak from my own experience. When I was in Year 8, I was invited to hang out with my friends at the local library but the day before, a relative had passed away so I had to say I couldn’t come. Expecting a response of condolence or something at least that was reassuring, I was thrown something totally different.

In Australia alone, a study produced in 2016 stated that at least 1 in 10 children are bullied online, out of which are 9 times more likely to commit suicide.

It is important and our job, as educators that we raise awareness, and promote that the fact that circumstances like cyber bullying is simply not permitted within school and within society.

If you or someone you know needs help and is experiencing this type of situation, please don’t be hesitant to contact Lifeline Australia on 13 11 14 or for international contacts numbers, click on this link: http://www.suicide.org/international-suicide-hotlines.html to find the suitable number for your country.

 

References

“Why are they (technology) important to me?”

Why is technology important to me?

Having cerebral palsy has impacted my life pretty majorly. It affected how I was with people, and I began to  question if I really belonged to my society, an age where physical looks and disabled terminology define who you are.

However, the evolution of technology helped in a way that I could be apart without being excluded because of my disability.

Actually the evolution of today’s technology has really impressed me. Back when my twin brother, who is mute, was younger, we would try use alphabet posters to teach him to recognise what fruit belongs to what letter or what object belonged to what number or letter.

Today, he now uses a program called Proloquo in which he selects a word which helps him create a phrase, and by pressing on the sentence, it dictates what he has written.

My brother’s communication skills have improved with new technology especially with devices like the IPad or the device of eye detection to select what he wanted. Much like what Stephen Hawking does when he types out what he wants his computer to say. Of course, the only way to motivate Ridge to do anything is to tell him that you’ll delete YouTube off his IPad. And it works too.

That’s another piece of technology. Social media and social websites are the dominance of today’s youth culture and society. Although it is rare in the good limelight, the World Wide Web provides opportunity for individuals to use it to their advantage to get their message across.

Ridge uses YouTube not only for entertainment and as a source of escape from being confined in his disabled body, but he uses it to also improve his knowledge in technology. Like us, as technology evolves, our minds do too. Searching for new ways, new paths, and new strategies to improve and make things better.

So, why are they (technology) important to you?

Are you ready? Here we go…Referencing:

“Do digital natives exist?”

Do digital natives exist? Of course they do! Digital natives have existed since the inventions of many technologies like the telephone by Alexander Bell, the invention of the light bulb by Thomas Edison or even the technologies of the cavemen, which they used for hunting and survival.

According to Marc Prensky’s “Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants Part 1″, suggests that individuals are confronted by the introduction of new technological terminology and using this as a practicality within today’s society. For many people today, new technology like the IPhone or iPad and their new formats produce”A language learned later in life, scientists tell us, goes into a different part of the brain…”, making it difficult for generations to communicate amongst each other using technology.

When I entered high school, I saw what they called “Smart Boards” and to be honest it was all so new to me that even other kids in my grade already had these in their own classrooms when they left primary school. For that brief moment, it felt like I was a ‘digital immigrant’ but I learnt quickly.

Most educators and facilitators that are in the classroom have difficulty in utilising technology and most often, students themselves teach the teachers how to turn on the SmartBoard or how to take away the sidebar from the window, even including how to move the cursor away from the streaming line when watching a Youtube video.

As technology continues to evolve, individuals should have the motivation to help “digital immigrants”  understand and assist them towards their confidence of using new technology rather than degrading them for their unknown understanding of the technology.

So what do you think? Are you a digital native or a digital immigrant? And do digital natives exist?

So are you ready? Here we go…

Referencing:

 

 

 

 

What do I do again? (First blog post)

*sighs* A blog. A blog, a blog, a blog, a blog, a blog. Where to begin a blog. What do I even write in a blog? Let me begin by defining what a blog is and then actually comparing it to what it actually means to us young people.

The Oxford Dictionary defines the term ‘blog’ as “a regularly updated website or web page, typically one run by an individual or small group, that is written in an informal or conversational style.”

However in today’s society, blogs are utilised as a relief for some people who have anger issues, or those who have issues with their boyfriends/girlfriends or people who like to blab about other people. Maybe it’s used for those who don’t even have a social life at all. Today’s blogs are filled with dedication to weird stuff like a TV Shows, movies, even a celebrity. Seriously, there’s this one Tumblr blog that is dedicated to one celebrity and their same image is posted every single day to prove the devotion some people have for that celebrity. I love Tumblr and Pinterest, they both are a godsend! I get ideas from them, like youth group lessons or quotes to put up on my laptop screensaver or cover photos on Facebook.

Blogs are essential. They’re here to reflect. For example, that amazing idea you had for a lesson plan that you wrote about 10 months ago can be used again for the next class you have. That creative game that you thought of can finally be put into action because you now have all the essentials you need for that activity. They’re here to make you think. You made a series note about the class you had substituted for. Maybe through that written post, you can find strategies to solve that issue and prevent it from ever coming up  again. You can reflect on the happiness of your career but also on the challenging and deeming moments and through that you can also provide advice, not just to others but to yourself in the future.

So that’s what I think that blogs represents. You tell me what they mean to you.

So are you ready? Here we go…

Reference:

  1. blog. Oxford Dictionaries. Oxford University Press, n.d. Web. 30 August 2016. <http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/blog&gt;.